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CURRENT TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS

The information posted on the page is provided by the curators
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THE LATEST EXHIBITIONS

. Exhibition: Heritage of the future: the contemporary art collection of Brukenthal National Museum
. Photo-documentary exhibition: Wood and Iron Processing in Transylvania – yesterday, today and tomorrow
. Exhibition: A history of the ball comprised in the dance cards
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Exhibition: A history of the ball comprised in the dance cards

Location: Brukenthal Palace, Engravings Cabinet
Duration: 22.06 – 17.09.2017
Opening: Thursday, June 22, 12:00 am
Curators: Dr. Raluca Maria Frîncu and Dr. Dana Roxana Hrib

Text from the curators:
A dance card is a ball booklet comprising a list of dance titles (sometimes the composers too) on one column and spaces for the name of the partners on the other column. It is a female accessory, fitted a ribbon or a decorative feature for attaching it to the wrist or the ball gown.
Dancing cards became popular in Vienna, coming into use in England and United States around 1830.
The Altemberger House – Museum of History inside Brukenthal National Museum has in its possession 234 dancing cards (dated in the 19th and the early 20th c.). Several cards have been presented to the public and published so far however this is the first exhibition dedicated to the collection.
The 48 items on display illustrate especially the period when the cards became very elaborate accessories, not only due to their precious printing but also for incorporating velvet, silk, metal and sometimes jewels, the novelty of the design intending to advertise the hosts of the ball and to underline the importance of their guests.
The exhibition also comprises information about organizing balls in Sibiu and the black tie dress code, original and reproductions after items in the engravings collections, clothing parts and accessories from the collections of the Museum of History.
Although dance cards lost their popularity before the middle of the 20th c., their social significance endures until today. Phrases such as “My dance card is full” or “Pencil me in” are still in use.
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